Making Feedback a Big Rock

Making Feedback a Big Rock: How can we provide an environment that encourages students to develop a disposition to seek and implement feedback?

Goal: Participants will gain an understanding of the possibilities to embed effective feedback into classroom culture to improve student learning and that this can be done without increasing teacher workload.

Description: Given that feedback is vital for student growth and using Stephen Covey’s concept of dedicating our limited available time for what is really important (Big Rocks), Rachel shares practical strategies to make feedback part of learning using discussion protocols and ideas from Ron Ritchhart’s ‘Creating Cultures of Thinking’. Making feedback a Big Rock leads to students developing their own understanding of the importance of feedback and thus the disposition to seek out and implement feedback they receive. Technological and non-technological strategies are included in this interactive workshop where participants will be actively involved in thinking routines and discussion protocols. 

Audience: Secondary focus but all welcome
Presenter: Rachel Merhebi - Ku-ring-gai High School
Code: WS1

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Leaders as Learners

Leaders as Learners: How Prioritising the Learning of Teachers Can Ignite a Culture of Thinking

Goal: Participants will  gain an insight into the experience of one school that is in the early  chapters of its ‘culture of thinking’ story. They will understand that “for classrooms  to be cultures of thinking for students, schools must be cultures of thinking  for teachers.” They will leave with a better understanding of their own  school’s story

Description: Creating a culture of thinking in your school: why might you start? Where could you start? Look inside the experience of one school that is in the early chapters of its ‘culture of thinking’ story. The application of relevant thinking protocols and routines will allow both participants and facilitators to review and reflect on their educational settings, and make plans to facilitate a culture of thinking in their schools.

Audience: Primary focus but adaptable to all settings
Presenters: Angela Churchland & Kate Bowyer
Code: WS2

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Presenters: Adam Majsay - Emanuel School
Code: WS3


Ka Boom!

Ka Boom! Science Inquiry for All Learners Using See, Think, Wonder

Goal:  How a Cultures of Thinking Routine (See, Think, Wonder) and strategies can be used to engage and inspire critical thinking and scientific inquiry in all learners. Intentional use of Cultures of Thinking Routines in Science and Technology can also assist teachers to increase the open-endedness of inquiry with their students and improve scientific literacy outcomes for all students.

Description: Teachers will engage in a short video clip and two simple experiments (that are suitable for primary school classrooms) to experience implementing Cultures of Thinking in our Science lessons. This workshop focuses on a simple physics concept, most relevant to School Years 6-8, as well as addressing Working Scientifically Outcomes. This workshop will also help educators to develop more open-ended inquiry, by modifying experiments they already complete in their programs.

Audience: Upper Primary & Secondary
Presenters: Nicolette Wheaton - MET School Armidale Campus
Code: WS4


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Presenters: Bridget Anderson - Meridan School
Code: WS5

Thinking for teachers

Thinking for teachers: creating whole school cultures of thinking

Goal: Participants will be challenged to consider the processes and structures that we may put in place to develop a culture of thinking for teachers as well as students.  
Participants will understand the concept of a focus group (a key element of developing and enriching a culture of thinking) and the protocols we may use for different purposes. There will also be some understanding on how to be an effective facilitator of teacher learning.  Participants will develop an understanding of the importance of teacher dialogue and the mechanisms we may implement to develop outcomes for student learning. Participants will develop an understanding of Masada's professional learning and begin to consider ways in which this could be integrated in their own context. 

Description: Developing a culture of thinking at an individual classroom level may not seem like a daunting process for many, but what about at the whole school level? How can we leverage existing and new mechanisms within your school to develop and enrich your culture of thinking? How can we promote a culture of thinking for our teachers to ensure that the business of teaching and learning remains on the table?
Ryan Gill, Head of Teaching and Learning 7-12 at Masada College, will share our journey over the last decade and enhance your understanding of the processes and structures that you may integrate in order to develop your culture of thinking across your school. This workshop, aimed at school leaders and those interested in developing a culture of thinking within a group in the school, will consider the theory and practices for your own educational context.

Audience: Primary & Secondary
Presenters: Ryan Gill - Masada College
Code: WS6


How can I push for depth in my students' thinking?

How can I push for depth in my students' thinking?

Goal: Participants will be exposed to a number of Visible Thinking routines and will see samples of student work in a High School English classroom. Participants will also be involved in discussions of thinking in the classroom with a focus on the Cultural Forces and the Understanding Map. Participants will be encouraged to think about how they can increase students' critical thinking in their own classrooms and units of work.

Description: Why is it that we teach intelligent students who don't want to think for themselves? With this question at the heart of his teaching over the last 10 years, David has explored a range of possible answers and solutions. During this workshop, David will discuss his own journey through Visible Thinking and Cultures of Thinking, with a particular emphasis on using student work to illustrate the effects of teaching practice on the depth of student thinking. Participants will discuss, engage in thinking routines and examine student work to reflect on their own teaching practice. All examples will be from High School English classes, but the routines and activities are applicable to all subjects.

Audience: Secondary
Presenters: David Camp - Emanuel School
Code: WS7


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Presenters: Marina Mattiuzzo - North Ryde Public School
Code: WS8



Thought-Provoking Questions

Thought-Provoking Questions

Goal: Participants will learn how to teach students to ask better questions. Through exploring the Question Starts routine, the notion of driving or essential questions, and the Question Formulation Technique, participants will leave with a handful of strategies to promote classroom interactions that better support great thinking and learning.

Description: Everything we know has its origins in questions, yet teachers tend to monopolise the right to question. The premise of this workshop is that students become more successful when they ask their own questions. If we were to make just one change to our classroom cultures, focusing on questioning is an obvious place to begin. What is a good question? How can we teach our students to ask better questions, and ultimately, how can we utilise questions to create new patterns of classroom discourse and promote interactions that better support thinking and learning?

Audience: Primary & Secondary
Presenters: Cameron Paterson (Shore School) & Natasha Terry-Armstrong (St Ignatius' College, Riverview)
Code: WS9


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Presenters: April Taylor - MET School
Code: WS10


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Presenters: Natasha Mercer  & Claire Cartwright - St Ives High School
Code: WS11


Stoking the Fires

Stoking the Fires: How might teachers help students become curious young people in service of developing deeper understanding and greater engagement?

Goal: Participants will understand that curiosity is more than a character trait that students either 'have' or 'don't have', but rather that it is a disposition which we as teachers can nurture.  They will understand how by drawing on the Seven-Point Learning Arc and creating opportunities for being curious they might grow learners with this disposition, and how this could benefit their learning and engagement.

Description: What role does curiosity have to play in developing cultures of thinking?  Are some children more curious than others?  Can we help children develop the disposition to be curious?  And what might be some of the pay-offs if we can?  In this interactive workshop, Simon will introduce participants to the theory of the Seven-Point Learning Arc, a practical framework teachers might use when fting learning opportunities for students which are rich with meaningful inquiry and perceived worth.  Simon will draw on examples from a variety of different faculty areas and age-ranges, exploring several practical strategies that teachers might employ to ignite students' curiosity, leading to deeper understanding, greater engagement, and ultimately to the growth of curious-minded young people.
 
‘Millions saw the apple fall, but Newton asked why’ – Bernard Baruch

Audience: Primary & Secondary
Presenters: Simon Brooks - Simon Brooks Education
Code: WS12


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Presenters: Dan Ryan - Meridian School
Code: WS13


Can You Speak Boy?

Can You Speak Boy? Teaching in a Boys’ School Creating and Promoting a Culture of Classroom Engagement

Goal: By the end of the workshop participants will be able understand and  answer the following based on their own context:
 
Guiding Questions: 

  • How can our understanding about boys’ research, enable us to harness the eight cultural forces to create meaningful opportunities to facilitate learning and engagement?
  •  As activators of learning, what practices do we do each day to engage our boys in the classroom to create a culture  of engagement?
  • Which tools can we use to assist our boys to make their thinking and understanding of the world around them visible and promote a culture of engagement?
  • What messages are we sending about what it means to be a learner in our classroom?

Description: As female leaders, girl is our first language, but why is it important that we learn to speak boy? How does an understanding of research into boys’ education guide our classroom practice, and student outcomes?
This interactive workshop will outline how to maximise the engagement of boys in the classroom using the research based Cultures of Thinking philosophy (Project Zero, Harvard), in particular the Eight Cultural Forces, various visible Thinking Routines and protocols.

  • As female leaders, girl is our first language but why is it important that we learn to speak boy? What does the research tell us?
  •  As activators of learning, what practices (cultural forces) do we do each day to engage our boys in the classroom to provide meaningful learning opportunities?
  •  Which tools (thinking routines and protocols) can we use to assist our boys to make their thinking and understanding of the world around them visible and promote a culture of engagement?

Audience: Female teachers in boys school - All welcome ... including men!
Presenters: Kylie Bowra - St Augustine's College Sydney
Code: WS14


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Presenters: Jacqui Galvin - Kildare Catholic College
Code: WS15


So what are these Thinking Routines anyway?

So what are these Thinking Routines anyway? A beginners guide to using Thinking Routines to foster engaged thinkers and learners.

Goal: Participants will understand how utilising Thinking Routines can

  • lead to deeper learning, more thoughtful and engaged students
  • foster students intellectual development
  • encourage greater motivation
  • cultivate the dispositional side of thinking
  • encourage a Growth Mindset

Description: In this is a practical workshop participants will focus on Thinking Routines - simple protocols for exploring ideas. Participants will explore Thinking Routines that introduce, explore, synthesise, organise and dig deeper. Through the routines themselves participants  will have the opportunity to  discuss ways these can be incorporated into their teaching, used for assessment and uncover what is happening in their students minds.

Audience: Primary
Presenters: Helen Maynard - Emanuel School
Code: WS16


How to create a Culture of Thinking

How to create a Culture of Thinking in a classroom, the impact it has on students and teachers without adding to an already time poor workload.

Goal: Cultures of Thinking can be integrated into any subject or classroom without adding a lot of extra work to an already overloaded time schedule. By explaining the journey Wendy has gone through, she aims to show that embracing a Culture of Thinking does not have to add extra time or planning. Just a change in how teaching happens which leads to great results.

Description: Looking at different Thinking Routines and how a change in language and methods of teaching has created a culture of thinking for both students and teacher. A practical session showcasing examples of Thinking Routines and 8 Cultures of Thinking. Discussions and questions will be encouraged to help teachers gain an insight into what they can do to aid their students.

Audience: Primary
Presenters: Wendy Williams - North Ryde Public School
Code: WS17


Language, interactions and time in Science

How might I use the cultural forces of language, interactions and time to help my students work scientifically rather than do science?

Goal: See - Think - Wonder? This is science! From drawings of the moon, models of DNA, sketches of cells, science is our fascination and portrayal of the world around us. Can a picture tell a thousand words? How might we encourage students to seek answers through active questioning, genuine curiosity and deep thinking? How might we bring students to experience 'Aha!' moments through their own observations? With a focus on three of the cultural forces, this workshop will allow collaboration and provide suggestions from successful classroom practice to walk away with examples of and the skills to identify images that hold the essence of science topics.

Description: To have students work as true scientists is not only important to foster enthusiasm but also necessary for the advancement of society. Participants will be given the opportunity to experience lessons exemplifying the use of See-Think-Wonder and the cultural forces of language, interactions and time in a science context. Techniques for questioning in ways that foster deep thinking will be explored. Helping students discover that not knowing the answer is essential to scientific genius, will also be discussed. Examples will be given during the workshop and time will be allocated for collaboration of ideas to develop a bank of images on a shared file that can be used for various units. Units can be those taught regularly or those which are difficult to teach. Participants are encouraged to make suggestions on the day of topics they would like to adopt See-Think-Wonder Routines into. The presenter has experience in all stages and branches of science, a background in mathematics and a passion for teaching. In this workshop you will have the chance to enjoy discovering, share your stories, walk away with usable resources and foster teaching practices that align with the philosophies of Cultures of Thinking to generate opportunities that nurture genuinely deep thinkers. 

Audience: Primary & Secondary
Presenters: Jenny Stephens - MET School
Code: WS18


Becoming Agentic Thinkers

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Audience: Primary & Secondary
Presenters: Nigel Coutts - Redlands
Code: WS19


Building a culture of thinking for us and our students.

Building a culture of thinking for us and our students.

Goal: Participants will begin to reflect upon and consider the impact that the 8 cultural forces can have on student learning and will have time to consider the messages that their students are getting about learning from their surroundings. Participants will leave with a range of practical approaches, having explored a number of thinking routines, to help create a thought-FULL learning environment for all learners.

Description: A culture of thinking is a learning environment which values independent thinking, awareness of how thinking happens and deeper understanding of what we are learning. So, how can we create classrooms where students are given opportunities to develop the disposition to think while also supporting them to see the value of thinking for themselves?
 
In this practical introductory workshop, we will uncover the 8 cultural forces that shape any learning environment and examine how they might be leveraged in a way that helps students to develop mindsets which are curious, reflective and critical while encouraging them to become alert to thinking and learning opportunities, and eager to take them.

Audience: Primary & Secondary
Presenters: Carla Gagliano - Masada College
Code: WS20


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Presenters: Ruqqiya Dean - Pymble Ladies' College
Code: WS21


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Presenters: Jesse Wright - Oakwood School
Code: WS22


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Presenters: Yvonne Garcia (Ku-ring-gai Creative Arts High School) & Tanya Davies (Ku-ring-gai High School)
Code: WS23


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Presenters: Tammy_Anne Caldwell - Woodthorpe School
Code: WS24


Putting Students in the Driving Seat

Putting Students in the Driving Seat: What would it be like if my students were the driving force behind their education and assessment?

Goal: Participants will come to understand that using an inquiry model which prioritises and gives time to thinking, students can uncover the curriculum for themselves and develop meaningful ways of demonstrating this through negotiated assessments. They will understand that it is through thinking that learning occurs and therefore see how giving students permission to 'drive' teachers can create opportunities for deeper and more fulfilling learning opportunities for all students. 

Description: Too often on the education road trip teachers are given the role of driver and navigator- carefully taking the main highway to a known destination of 'understanding' with student passengers along for the ride. But what if we as teachers relinquished the keys and let the students direct us to that same destination?
In this interactive workshop Alice will share her experience of how she put her students in the driving seat by using an inquiry model prioritising thinking and allowing students to assist in shaping the teaching program and negotiating assessment while still meeting the content demands of the Australian Curriculum.

Audience: Primary & Secondary
Presenters: Alice Clement - Woodthorpe School
Code: WS25


The Heart of Collaboration

The Heart of Collaboration - How might unlocking the DNA of collaboration bring life to the classroom and transform minds?

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What do we need to really know about collaboration in order for it to work in our classrooms? What assumptions must be shed? What conflations must be disentangled? Most importantly, what is possible? This workshop, through both experiential and reflective learning, will enable participants to:

  • Consider how we can define and model collaboration for students.
  • Experience practices and philosophies that are required to make collaboration an effective agent for transformation. 
  • Question how students may use collaboration to 'cultivate the mind' of their peer, and, how to open themselves up to 'be cultivated'. 

Participants will be given time to wonder and to create their own collaborative task.

Description: The Heart of Collaboration: Collaboration, at its best, is transformative. As Vera John-Steiner puts it, collaboration is "an affair of the mind." The experience of thinking, connecting and evolving together is the marrow of deep learning. The true DNA of collaboration contains a dynamism that, when evocatively harnessed, allows for cultivation of minds. Activating collaboration within a classroom is contingent on designing tasks and experiences that draw on this DNA. Once we transcend group work, and fully embrace the interpersonal, interpersonal and cognitive potential of true collaboration, we can create a wondrous culture of transformation.

  • What is the DNA of true collaboration? Literally, what is the simple, explicit and pragmatic schemata that generates collaboration? (Cultural Force: Language)
  • How can the practices and philosophies of collaboration generate a culture of transformation through cultivation? (Cultural Force: Routines and Structures)
  • What if the most valued outcome was a students ability to use collaboration to 'cultivate' and 'be cultivated'? (Cultural Force: Expectations)

Audience: Primary & Secondary
Presenters: Margo Bowen - Turramurra High School
Code: WS26


To boldly think where no one has thought before

To boldly think where no one has thought before - An Innovative Design Project for Primary and Junior Secondary

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Presenters: Alannah Nastase, Shireen Winrow & Friends - Redlands
Code: WS27


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Presenters: Peter Mahony - Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences
Code: WS28


Thinking and Creativity in the Mathematics Classroom

Thinking and Creativity in the Mathematics Classroom

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Audience: Primary and Lower Secondary
Presenters: Amber Bidwell, Melanie Cleary, Catriona Ling & Karen Pittard - Redlands
Code: WS29


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Presenters: Rhonda Kaidbay - Ryde Secondary College
Code: WS30


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Code: WS31


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Code: WS32


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Code: WS33


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Code: WS34